Music the artform and artists

The Voice Project supports victims in Central Africa

What do you get when a man with a few famous friends uses Karinthy’s Six Degrees of Separation to send a message (and a song) around the world? You get the Voice Project, a charity that aims to support the victims of Joseph Kony’s Lord’s Resistance Army in Uganda, South Sudan, the Central African Republic and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The charity came about when Hunter Heaney heard groups of widows and rape victims writing and singing songs of a style called dwog paco whilst working at an Internally Displaced Person’s camp in northern Uganda. These songs encouraged child soldiers who had escaped Kony’s LRA to return home and be forgiven for the atrocities they were forced to commit. Taking inspiration from the women’s groups and the increasing success in their mission, Heaney, along with friends Anna Gabriel (daughter of Peter) and Chris Holmes of indie band Ashtar Command, set out to bring more exposure to dwog paco and the issue facing the women’s groups in North Uganda.

songlines

London International Festival of Exploratory Music (LIFEM)

The London International Festival of Exploratory Music (better known as LIFEM) is has rolled around again, and this year the theme is Sounds from the Arctic Cool.

Between the October 31 and November 3, six acts from across Scandinavia (as well as Yorkshire-based indie-folk band Tomorrow We Sail), will bring their sounds to King’s Place for LIFEM’s fourth celebration of international music.

With genres as far reaching as rock, jazz and traditional, the festival is set to provide a wide view of the Scandinavian music scene. Artists scheduled to perform include EF and Frida Hyvönen of Sweden, Deaf Centre and Biosphere of Norway and RinneRadio and Wimme Saari and Tapani Rinne from Finland. 

songlines

9th Konya International Mystic Music Festival

9th edition of the Konya International Mystic Music Festival will take place under the serene shadow of Mevlana Rumi's tomb, in Konya - a city ripe with mysticism.

Konya is located at the heart of Anatolia, also known as Asia Minor, in Central Turkey. It is the site of one the earliest settlements on earth. The modern-day city is like an open-air museum with diverse cultural and historic influences on display throughout. Konya became a city of world renown due to Mevlana Jelaluddin Rumi (September 30th 1207 - December 17th, 1273), an acclaimed sufi and poet who lived and died here. Mevlana was born to a family of scholars in Balkh, a town located in today's Afghanistan. Since childhood, he received excellent training in the arts and sciences. Eventually, migration through the long and arduous routes of Central Asia brought him and his family to Anatolia and on May 3rd, 1228 he arrived in Konya. He was introduced to divine love by Shams of Tabriz, who came to Konya in 1244 and disappeared suddenly in 1247. Inspired by the fire of this divine love, Mevlana became a sufi dervish and poet. The poems he recited while whirling trance-like during the sema have become some of the most widely read in the world.

mysticmusicfest.com

Putumayo Delves into the Fresh, Upbeat Sounds of the Arabic Scene from Damascus to Casablanca and Beyond on Arabic Beat

Across the Middle East and North Africa, the beat goes on. Inspired by music from across the globe but true to Arabic music’s deep roots, the sounds of raï’s rolling funk and the shimmering pulse of raqs sharki (“belly dance” music) tell the story of a thriving contemporary scene that stretches across the breadth of the Mediterranean.

This scene shines on Putumayo’s Arabic Beat, a collection that chronicles the musical creativity of Arabic musicians today. The album revels in artists rarely heard in the West: the unsung stars and hit- makers who shape the region’s music. 

worldmusicwire.com

In the Footsteps of Alan Lomax: The Artists Behind the Music

If you know any of Aaron Copland's music, then you probably know "Hoedown," the finale of "Rodeo," the score that Mr. Copland wrote in 1942 for Agnes de Mille's ever-popular ballet about love among the cowpokes. "Hoedown" is a high-stepping orchestral fantasy based on "Bonaparte's Retreat," a 19th-century fiddle tune that Mr. Copland ran across in "Our Singing Country," a 1941 book co-edited by Alan Lomax, the celebrated folk-song collector. The version of "Bonaparte's Retreat" found in "Our Singing Country" was transcribed from a recording made by Mr. Lomax on a 1937 trip to Kentucky for the Library of Congress. It's a note-for-note rendering of the way the song was played by a fiddler named Bill Stepp. Every time you hear a symphony orchestra perform "Hoedown," you hear the ghost of Mr. Stepp's supremely virtuosic playing.

 

Source : The Wall Street Journal

Treatment With Fungi Makes a Modern Violin Sound Like a Stradivarius

A good violin depends not only on the expertise of the violin maker, but also on the quality of the wood that is used. The Swiss wood researcher Professor Francis W. M. R. Schwarze (Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, St. Gallen, Switzerland) has succeeded in modifying the wood for a violin through treatment with special fungi. This treatment alters the acoustic properties of the instrument, making it sound indistinguishably similar to a Stradivarius.

 

Source : sciencedaily.com

Paralympics closing ceremony review: an emotional and fiery finale

Six weeks after Bradley Wiggins rang in a golden summer that has exceeded all expectations, Coldplay have soundtracked an emotional final extinguishing of the flame by two of the biggest names of the Paralympics.

Ellie Simmonds and Jonnie Peacock were as much of a draw as musical guests Jay-Z and Rihanna when they stepped forward to finally put out the flame that has burned brightly throughout both Games.

 

Source : guardian

London Jazz Festival 2012 full programme announced

The London Jazz festival today announces the lineup for its 20th festival with over 250 shows at over 50 venues across the city.

The festival, which runs from 9 to 18 November, will host some of jazz's biggest stars, including Herbie Hancock playing his first ever UK solo show, the 82-year-old Sonny Rollins, Chick Corea and Jan Garbarek. Younger talent will be amply represented by the likes of double bassist Esperanza Spalding, pianist Robert Glasper and trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire.

 

Source : guardian

Stalker Festival at Kultuurikatel opens a gate to the power plant

In today’s Kultuurikatel Andrei Tarkovski filmed the key scene of his cult movie „Stalker“ – entering the zone. The gate of the zone was the threshold into a mystical world where a person could fulfil his most hidden wishes. This symbol of the stalker or the adventurous seeker lives on in Kultuurikatel as Stalker Festival, where the visitor will experience unexpected situations, sense the presence of the future and feel the special atmosphere of the power plant of adventurous culture.

 

Source : kultuurikatel.ee


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