Technologies and media

Un tatouage invisible contre le piratage audio

Le piratage audio constitue un fléau ordinaire à l’heure où les internautes téléchargent et s’échangent quotidiennement des fichiers musicaux. Il existe à présent un tatouage audio indécelable pour les oreilles et les appareils des fraudeurs, mis au point par une équipe de l’Université de Sherbrooke.

Pieuvre

Aye Yo, Pass Me the Aux!

The next generation of music fans will never know the epic power of a humble cord.

Cuepoint

Music player for the ability-impaired

Most of the hacks we come across here at Hackaday don’t require much more than being “cool” to get our attention.

Hackaday

Where is radio at today and where is it headed?

“When I started, there was a single, linear channel which was radio. And you were absolutely obsessed by making that one channel as good as possible."

Radio Prague

Trance music hides secret messages in new encryption technique

Next time you find yourself dancing to trance music in a club, listen carefully to the tempo — it may be sending you a message.

Digital Trends

Musique et nouvelles technologies - quelques réflexions

Etre ému, se mouvoir c'est se souvenir du plaisir d'un son. C'est très résumé à peu près ce que le philosophe Philippe Lacoue-Labarthes pensait de la musique. Il y a des faits de mémoire.

Media Part

Technology isn’t just changing the way we listen to music

Music genres ain’t what they used to be. There has never been a better time to write and record songs and sounds, thanks to the boom in social media and the flick-of-a-switch access to a world of influences, ideas and inspiration.

NZ Listener

Algorithm and blues: Putting a Google-written song to the test

Google’s computers wrote a song. In the hands of a professional musician, does the tune have potential?

The Star

Is Bandcamp the Holy Grail of Online Record Stores?

A lesser-known artist you love makes a new recording — say, the hip-hop group Clipping or the Chicago punk band Mace or the electronic composer Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith. You feel you have to graft it onto your life. How does that go for you these days?

The New York Times


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